The Cross and the Lynching Tree
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Publisher : Orbis Books
Release Date : 2011
ISBN 10 : 160833001X
Pages : 202 pages
Rating : 5/5 from 1 reviews
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A landmark in the conversation about race and religion in America. "They put him to death by hanging him on a tree." Acts 10:39 The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this powerful new work, theologian James H. Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of black folk. Both the cross and the lynching tree represent the worst in human beings and at the same time a thirst for life that refuses to let the worst determine our final meaning. While the lynching tree symbolized white power and "black death," the cross symbolizes divine power and "black life" God overcoming the power of sin and death. For African Americans, the image of Jesus, hung on a tree to die, powerfully grounded their faith that God was with them, even in the suffering of the lynching era. In a work that spans social history, theology, and cultural studies, Cone explores the message of the spirituals and the power of the blues; the passion and of Emmet Till and the engaged vision of Martin Luther King, Jr.; he invokes the spirits of Billie Holliday and Langston Hughes, Fannie Lou Hamer and Ida B. Well, and the witness of black artists, writers, preachers, and fighters for justice. And he remembers the victims, especially the 5,000 who perished during the lynching period. Through their witness he contemplates the greatest challenge of any Christian theology to explain how life can be made meaningful in the face of death and injustice.

The Cross and the Lynching Tree

by James H. Cone

A landmark in the conversation about race and religion in America. "They put him to death by hanging him on a tree." Acts 10:39 The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this powerful new work, theologian James H. Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of black folk. Both the cross and the lynching tree represent the worst in human beings

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The Lynching of Cleo Wright

by Dominic J. Capeci Jr.

On January 20, 1942, black oil mill worker Cleo Wright assaulted a white woman in her home and nearly killed the first police officer who tried to arrest him. An angry mob then hauled Wright out of jail and dragged him through the streets of Sikeston, Missouri, before burning him alive. Wright's death was, unfortunately, not unique in American history, but what his death meant in the larger context of life in the United States in the twentieth-century is an important and

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Blood Justice

by Howard Smead

Reconstructs the case of Mack Charles Parker, a young African-American man who was lynched by a white mob in 1959 after being charged with the rape of a white woman in Poplarville, Mississippi.

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The Lynching of Emmett Till

by Christopher Metress

Uses excerpts from newspapers and editorials and accounts of the murder and trial to examine the lynching of fourteen-year-old Emmett Till in 1955, in a volume which also contains selections from poems, songs, interviews, essays, and memoirs relating to the incident.

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The Lynching of Louie Sam

by Elizabeth Stewart

After Native American Louie Sam is suspected of killing someone, he is chased into Canada and lynched, but teenager George Gillies, a newcomer to Washington Territory, doesn't think Louie was guilty and sets out to investigate.

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The Lynching of Language

by Sandra L. Ragan,Christina Beck,Dianne G. Bystrom,Lynda L. Kaid

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The Lynching of Mexicans in the Texas Borderlands

by Nicholas Villanueva Jr.

More than just a civil war, the Mexican Revolution in 1910 triggered hostilities along the border between Mexico and the United States. In particular, the decade following the revolution saw a dramatic rise in the lynching of ethnic Mexicans in Texas. This book argues that ethnic and racial tension brought on by the fighting in the borderland made Anglo-Texans feel justified in their violent actions against Mexicans. They were able to use the legal system to their advantage, and their actions

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Coatesville and the Lynching of Zachariah Walker

by Dennis B. Downey,Raymond M. Hyser

On a warm August night in 1911, Zachariah Walker was lynched--burned alive--by an angry mob on the outskirts of Coatesville, a prosperous Pennsylvania steel town. At the time of his very public murder, Walker, an African American millworker, was under arrest for the shooting and killing of a respected local police officer. Investigated by the NAACP, the horrific incident garnered national and international attention. Despite this scrutiny, a conspiracy of silence shrouded the events, and the accused men and boys were

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The Lynching of Ladies

by Jo Ann Mason

The Lynching of Ladies is the first in a trilogy of memoirs about two best friends. After experiencing one traumatic experience after another, one dresses herself in tenacity and perseverance and the other in self-loathing and defeat. These ladies experience social, emotional, and physical lynchings throughout their young lives. When Casey tells Arianna, "Men go off to war, women go off to men there are casualties in both," a turning point begins. Both carry the broken pieces of their adolescence

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Ameno Black  the Lynching of Arliss Black

by M.E. Robertson-Hoon

He is a blast from the Yarford city past and now he is beat reporter for the city paper. I thought this may be refreshing new beginning by introducing a character from the past, well at least it was not the two-faced Chester Mingolt - everyone can now take a collective sigh of relief.

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Judicial Lynching  The Lynching of Citizen Charles Tyson  An Expose

by Charles Tyson

I am a Man that's been thrown into Prison by all means. I had no Rights at my trial, Constitutional, or otherwise. I wrote the Book to show the Public what steps the Courts in South Carolina will take to imprison this Citizen. The reader can make his or her own mind about why I gave the Book its Title.

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Witnessing Lynching

by Anne P. Rice

Witnessing Lynching: American Writers Respond is the first anthology to gather poetry, essays, drama, and fiction from the height of the lynching era (1889 1935). During this time, the torture of a black person drew thousands of local onlookers and was replayed throughout the nation in lurid newspaper reports. The selections gathered here represent the courageous efforts of American writers to witness the trauma of lynching and to expose the truth about this uniquely American atrocity. Included are well-known authors and activists

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The Lynching

by Laurence Leamer

The New York Times bestselling author of The Kennedy Women chronicles the powerful and spellbinding true story of a brutal race-based killing in 1981 and subsequent trials that undid one of the most pernicious organizations in American history—the Ku Klux Klan. On a Friday night in March 1981 Henry Hays and James Knowles scoured the streets of Mobile in their car, hunting for a black man. The young men were members of Klavern 900 of the United Klans of America. They were

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At the Hands of Persons Unknown

by Philip Dray

WINNER OF THE SOUTHERN BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FOR NONFICTION • “A landmark work of unflinching scholarship.”—The New York Times This extraordinary account of lynching in America, by acclaimed civil rights historian Philip Dray, shines a clear, bright light on American history’s darkest stain—illuminating its causes, perpetrators, apologists, and victims. Philip Dray also tells the story of the men and women who led the long and difficult fight to expose and eradicate lynching, including Ida B. Wells, James

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The First Waco Horror

by Patricia Bernstein

In 1916, in front of a crowd of ten to fifteen thousand cheering spectators watched as seventeen-year-old Jesse Washington, a retarded black boy, was publicly tortured, lynched, and burned on the town square of Waco, Texas. He had been accused and convicted in a kangaroo court for the rape and murder of a white woman. The city's mayor and police chief watched Washington's torture and murder and did nothing. Nearby, a professional photographer took pictures to sell as mementos of that

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Suspended Sentence

by Benjamin S. Bradford

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What Virtue There Is in Fire

by Edwin T. Arnold

The 1899 lynching of Sam Hose in Newnan, Georgia, was one of the earliest and most gruesome events in a tragic chapter of U.S. history. Hose was a black laborer accused of killing Alfred Cranford, a white farmer, and raping his wife. The national media closely followed the manhunt and Hose’s capture. An armed mob intercepted Hose’s Atlanta-bound train and took the prisoner back to Newnan. There, in front of a large gathering on a Sunday afternoon, Hose

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The Lynching of Jube Benson

by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar (June 27, 1872 - February 9, 1906) was an African-American poet, novelist, and playwright of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Born in Dayton, Ohio, to parents who had been slaves in Kentucky before the American Civil War, Dunbar started to write as a child and was president of his high school's literary society. He published his first poems at the age of 16 in a Dayton newspaper. Much of his more popular work in his lifetime was written in the

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Lynching in the New South

by William Fitzhugh Brundage

Based on analysis of nearly 600 cases, this volume offers a full appraisal of the complex character of lynching. An original aspect of this work demonstrates the role blacks played in combatting lynching, either by flight, protest, or organized opposition which culminated in the expansion of the NAACP.

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White Man s Heaven

by Kimberly Harper

Drawing on court records, newspaper accounts, penitentiary records, letters, and diaries, White Man’s Heaven is a thorough investigation into the lynching and expulsion of African Americans in the Missouri and Arkansas Ozarks in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Kimberly Harper explores events in the towns of Monett, Pierce City, Joplin, and Springfield, Missouri, and Harrison, Arkansas, to show how post–Civil War vigilantism, an established tradition of extralegal violence, and the rapid political, economic, and social change

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